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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of Gaelic place names in the Glens of Antrim. found in the catalog.

Gaelic place names in the Glens of Antrim.

Francis Joseph Bigger

Gaelic place names in the Glens of Antrim.

by Francis Joseph Bigger

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Published by M"Caw, Stevenson& Orr, Ltd. in Belfast .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Reprinted from Ulster Journal of Archaeology, 11:3-4.

Other titlesUlster Journal of Archaeology.
ContributionsM"Caw, Stevenson & Orr (Belfast),
The Physical Object
Pagination23p. ;
Number of Pages23
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20334404M

Arthurs, J. B., 'Place Names', in Belfast in its Regional Setting (Belfast, ), Hayward, Richard, Ulster and the City of Belfast (London, ), Pender, Seamus (ed.), A Census of Ireland, circa (Dublin, ). The figures given for the whole barony of Belfast (Upper and Lower)* are only persons, of whom were Valley - Strath - Glens of Antrim - Great Glen - Ravine - Glenrothes - Glen of Imaal - Glengowrie, South Australia - Goidelic languages - Irish language - Scottish Gaelic - Manx language - Welsh language - Northern England - Glenridding - Westmorland - Haltwhistle - Northumberland - Cumbric - Brittonic languages - Scottish Lowlands - River - Northern Ireland - Ballycastle, County Antrim - Larne

  The pillaging of the island's church and burning of its buildings took place in (The burning of Reachrainn by plunderers; and its shrines were broken and plundered.) In , Robert the Bruce sought refuge upon Rathlin, owned by the Irish Bissett family. He stayed in Rathlin Castle, originally belonging to their lordship the Glens of :// The lectures planned for Friday 16th October and Friday 20th November will not now take place. It is intended, again depending on circumstances, that monthly lectures will resume in early and I hope to welcome all of you to these popular talks as we go forward into the new year. The committee of the Glens of Antrim Historical

The Glens of Antrim The Glens of Antrim, known and the Glens were one of the last places in Northern Ireland where Gaelic was spoken. The names of the glens, from south to north, are: Glenarm, Glencloy, Glenariff, Glenballyeamon, Glenaan, Glencorp, Glendun, Glenshesk and Glentaisie. ² The Lordship of the Glens, from the midth century


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Gaelic place names in the Glens of Antrim by Francis Joseph Bigger Download PDF EPUB FB2

the Gaelic language. Thus names were often misheard, poorly understood and misrepresented in a new way that was alien to those who held them. During the discussion phase of this book it was agreed that were possible to employ Gaelic spellings to these names, so that they are reconnected to their own sense of self, as the This article first appeared in The Glynns volume 8 ().

It is re – presented here with additional photographs and hyperlinks. The parish of Layd is entirely situated in the barony of Lower Glenarm and is bounded on the north by the parish of Culfeightrin and the Granges of Innispollan and Layd; on the south by the parish of Ardclinis, on the east by the sea and on the west by the parish Scottish Gaelic & Antrim Irish A talk by Brian MacLochlainn a fluent speaker of both Scottish Gaelic and Antrim Irish on the influences these have had on colloquailisms and dialect of Co.

Antrim (in particular Rathlin Island & The Glens of Antrim) up to the late 19th or early 20th :// Wartime Memories: An excerpt from The Glens of Antrim Historical Society’s Oral History Project. JAMES MACDONNELL,MD () by Peter Froggatt 3 thoughts on “PLACE-NAMES IN THE PARISH OF CULFEIGHTRIN by Cahal Dallat” Variant spelling of names within the English language name structure is also common, but this is not particularly significant within the Glens where there are comparatively few common non-Gaelic names.

The principal example involves the Robinsons of Glenarm, and mid and east Antrim :// THE page hardback book, titled - 'CORRIGAN PARK. A PLACE APART'- a unique history of Gaelic Games in the Glens of Antrim, South West Antrim, and South Antrim, with special spotlight on Corrigan Park - can be purchased direct from author Denis O'Hara.

2,   There is the Feis of the Glens, which has been held since this festival is the most famous cultural event in The Glens of Antrim and has been running since It is a celebration of arts and crafts, field events, language, poetry, singing and dancing which takes place over various dates throughout June and :// Soon the movement spread to the Glens and the G.A.A.

in Co. Antrim became a reality”. John ‘Benmore’ Clarke – (Image courtesy: Mc Sparran, J: The History of Gaelic Games in The Glens of Antrim) About the first clubs in the Glens were started notably Glenarm Shauns and Carey :// LONG-FORGOTTEN GAELIC SONGS OF RATHLIN AND THE GLENS by Sorcha Nic Lochlainn This article first appeared in The Glynns Volume 37 ().

It is reproduced here in full. ‘Numberless legendary and fabulous tales and songs are recited and sung in Irish round the fire, by persons who do little else.

These, however, are confined Read more   Putting the heart back into the Glens of Antrim The place was very dear to his relative Roger Casement, the leader.

periods and hyphens are allowed in screen names. :// /putting-the-heart-back-into-the-glens-of-antrim   8,Ballymena and west Antrim.

Place-names of Northern Ireland. – Vol County Antrim / general editor: Nollaig Ó Muraíle. – Belfast: Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen’s University of Belfast, Place-names of Northern Ireland / edited by Gerard Stockman. – Vol County   Presentation of the History of the GAA in the Glens of Antrim.

The History of Gaelic Games in the Glens of Antrim 2. Barney McKeownAnd the man who made the ballAnd the place they went to practise first,Was in the McKeownstown Fall   Gaelic had been the spoken language for most inhabitants of the Glens up until the early 19th access to the Glens opened up the area to non Gaelic speaking settlers and by very few had a command of the interesting exception was Rathlin Island where Gaelic was still the dominant first Feis na nGleann Between me and the place where my great love is.

but the poem book itself has a Glens connection. It was commissioned by Captain Sorley MacDonnell, one of the Antrim McDonnells, as a record of the ancient tales and poems about the Fianna.

‘Irish in the Glens of Antrim’, The Gaelic Journal:Irisleabhar na Gaedhilge, 6 (), The Galloway Glens team were fortunate enough to book early enough to attend Galloway Gaelic Lost Province event at the CatStrand on Saturday the 8th of September. Organised by Gàidhlig Dumgal and with Professor Ted Cowan keeping everything in order the conference explored the use of the language in Galloway, the relationship of Galloway The Gaelic or Erse form of this word, Galloglaigh, (i.e.

Gallagher) occurs as a family name in Northern Ireland. There was a constant coming and going between North East Ireland and Western Scotland. The Glens of Antrim were in the hands of Scottish Macdonalds by, and for the next two hundred years Gaelic-speaking Scots came in large Scots Gaelic.

There were two septs of this name; on Lewis in the Hebrides they were a sept of Clan MacLeod while in Dunbartonshire the McAuleys were a branch of Clan MacGregor.

A branch of the latter sept accompanied the McDonalds to the Glens of Antrim in the early 16th century. Irish. A County Fermanagh sept who trace their descent from Donn Their descendants, having amalgamated with the native Irish, still occupy the Glens, and Gaelic is spoken among them to this day.

The spread of these turbulent Scots in Ulster is thus noticed by Mr. Hill in his Macdonnells of Antrim: “In the year the council in Dublin forwarded this gloomy announcement on the subject ot the council Feis na nGleann: A Century of Gaelic Culture in the Antrim Glens traces the origins of Feis na nGleann in that crease in time between Parnell and the Rising.

In a series of scholarly chapters, experts profile the historic founders of the Feis and record the history of Irish in the :// Johnson, Johnston—These two names need a rather lengthy the first case the name Johnson has been assumed by several of those bearing the names Makeon, M'Keon, McKeown, and Mac Eoin, in the districts surrounding Tuam, Co.

Galway, and in several districts of Co. Sligo. The names referred to are various forms of the original Gaelic Mac. ISBN: OCLC Number: Language Note: Text in English and Gaelic.

Description: xv, pages: illustrations ; 27 cm: Responsibility:The author has immersed himself further in the Gaelic literature of place so that readers, with book in hand, can make the past come alive and appreciate the extracts about a place and what has happened there.

As an adult, Neil M. Gunn saw himself as a boy, sitting on a slab in the middle of the river cracking hazelnuts with a ://  The word Líofa means ‘fluent’ and this is precisely what The Líofa Initiative strives to achieve – a greater number of fluent Irish ://